Browsed by
Tag: personality as a second language

A manual typewriter produced this post

A manual typewriter produced this post

I am writing this blog post on a manual typewriter and you are asking why. On this portable Royal made in the 1940s, I get no interference from the internet. Nobody is spying on me. I feel I am carving letters into stone instead of floating temporary nothingness into a cold, silent universe. Finally, a typewriter demands more focus on correctness of spelling, grammar and well-constructed thoughts.

Typewriters once freed me from loneliness when I was a teenager. Some innate passion to write bubbled up around age sixteen and has only grown more ferocious over many years. When my son Jason gifted me this machine last year for my birthday, I had no idea what joy lay before me. From his perspective, hearing me clack and sound the carriage bell immediately triggered memories of his father at the dining room table with a chain of cigarettes hanging from his lips. These were nice memories for the both of us. Yes, I am sorry cigarettes are death threats to us. I gave them up around 1979, but still miss them and the sexiness surrounding the smoking culture of my generation.

So are you now asking how this hard copy typing got digitalized for a blog post? To me, it was surprising how easy it was to just take a photo through the Microsoft Office Lens app, then edit it digitally right away.

I am including a photo of the original typewritten piece so you can peek at the process.

At least the next few posts will start on this Royal. I am speaking my own Personality as a Second Language (PSL) through a typewriter. I even love how the machine smells. The bottom line, and this IS the bottom line, is that THE REAL ME IS BACK!

manual typewriter
First draft on manual typewriter
Can clothes reveal your personality?

Can clothes reveal your personality?

Can you guess a person’s personality type by their clothing? I spent hours in crowded airports the last few weeks and I am convinced that even amateur personality typers can eyeball clothing and correctly guess a personality type at 50% or higher. Yes, you can guess wrong, sometimes more than 50%, but do pat yourself on the back and let yourself to be pleasantly surprised when you find out you can nail the personality of lots of people by noticing their clothes.

For me, Blue Gurus are the easiest to spot. Dead giveways of course are tie-dye skirts and loosely tied-up hair, but Blues would be horrified if you stereotyped the lot of them as hippies. Still, twenty-first century Blues can tend to wear not-so-trendy “comfort clothes” that hippies surely favored, like loose-fitting shirts and skirts of soft and simple fabrics — more outdoorsy cotton and wool than silky or sythetic flash. Notice soft functional shoes and sandals, minimal earthy jewelry, as well as satchels with wide shoulder straps.

Gold Loyalists aren’t so difficult to spot either. Obviously the ultimate Gold attire is trendy-conservative to the point of looking “uniform”. Relax, Golds, that too is an unfair stereotype. But face it, Gold clothing tends to be good quality yet economical, not-over-the-top trendy, appropriate, clean, matching, color-coordinated, and acceptable for each setting. The Gold “package” says “I care” and “I am careful about my outward appearance.” This includes manicuring, near-to-trendy hair, and tasteful quality jewelry. Golds are modest and of course want to look sexy “when appropriate,” but rarely over-the-top.

I think Greens are the hardest to spot. Yes, many dress like stereotypical “geeks” with more function than fashion — unashamed to wear a Go-Pro camera or Google glasses, mismatched shorts and shirts, ugly but comfortable shoes, and unkempt hair. On the other hand, perfectionistic Green Geeks who are sensitive about their image of careful competence might choose to wear attractive and comfortable outfits that range from formal business to less formal. They might pro-actively choose what’s professional and what makes them approachable. In any case, many Greens will agree they don’t want their clothing calling attention to their physical selves over their good ideas and accomplishments.

Orange Badasses dress with style — personal style. Their clothes tend to scream “I am free and I am me.” I am a star athlete or a cool musician or a dancer or the best carpenter in the world or the bravest fire fighter or the sexiest dude in town or the most laid-back artist on the river. If any personality type is over-the-top, it can be an Orange Badass — creative, colorful, tattooed, very “today,” or one of a kind — in any case, cool — a player, a free agent, a physical star, an action seeker, a risk-taker, or even an introverted but free spirit. You’ll be surprised at how many startlingly creative dressers are introverted Oranges. Like Badass words and behavior, Orange clothes can make a stand that “rules are for other people.”

Try guessing the four personality types in crowded places. I prefer airports because all Colors will show up there for sure. Even better are crowds of tourists in other countries. If you really want a slice of society, check out shopping malls in December.